Military OneSource Webinars

Military OneSource Webinars (Interactive Webinars)

Have a Healthier Summer

Summer is almost here! This can mean lots of BBQs, vacations, and plenty of sun. Join us for a webinar presentation to learn tips to stay healthy and safe during the summer months.

June 14th 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm | June 20th 2:00 – 3:00 pm

Link: https://connect.militaryonesourceconnect.org/iwebs/ (link for both event dates)

Presenter: Liz Gray and Alyson Lilley

 

PTSD Care and Support: Real Warriors Campaign Resources

Post-traumatic stress disorder can develop after experiencing, witnessing or learning the details of a traumatic event. Join this webinar to learn about the care and support available to those suffering with PTSD.

June 21st 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Link: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5172326288832376323

Presenter: Air Force TSgt Bradley Blair

 

Michael J. Meier | Minnesota Military OneSource State Consultant
Contractor
michael.meier@militaryonesource.com | Office: 612-751-4290
Visit www.militaryonesource.mil or call: 800-342-9647
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Partners in Prevention Spring Newsletter

We are getting ready to celebrate another great year and we’d love for you to join us. Attached is our Spring Newsletter.

PIP Newsletter Spring 2018.pdf

Monday, June 4th, 9-10:30am
IOCP, Shannon Hall

Coffee and bagels will be provided. 🙂

Alison Wobschall, M.A.

Partners in Prevention, Director
Plymouth, Minnesota
(612) 412-8202
alison.wobschall@wayzataschools.org

 

Partners in Prevention is a community coalition working to prevent and reduce youth substance use. We are nearly all volunteers representing more than twelve different sectors within the community, including: business, civic/volunteer organizations, health care, government, law enforcement, media, other substance abuse organizations, parents, religious organizations, school, youth, and youth-serving organizations. We rely heavily on collaboration to support our efforts to positively impact our community. We are hoping to reduce substance use by addressing the factors in our community that increase the risk of use and also by promoting the protective factors that minimize the risk of use.

PIP serves the Wayzata School District, consisting of all or parts of Corcoran, Maple Grove, Medicine Lake, Medina, Minnetonka, Orono, Plymouth, and Wayzata. The district educates over 11,000 students made up of eight elementary schools, three middle schools and one high school.

Lecture Opportunity – Human Stress Response in Veterans 

Who:  Open to the public
What:  Dr. Stevan Hobfoll (Speaker)
Where:  College of St. Scholastica Science Center Auditorium
When:  May 3rd at 6 pm (time may change slightly)
POC:  Jeff Pearson at Jpearson3@css.edu or 218-723-5944

**Synopsis of lecture:
Dr. Hobfoll will speak regarding the background of human stress response as well as PTS. He will highlight his research and treatment successes of PTS among the veteran population, as well as how combat, experience and social factors affect PTS among US and Isreali Defense Forces veterans.

Youth Mental Health First Aid Class – May 11th

Attached is a flyer for a Youth Mental Health First Aid class that we are offering on May 11th at the North Memorial Health Specialty Center located at 3435 West Broadway Ave in Robbinsdale. This class is free, but space is limited – register early!  To register for this class, please visit northmemorial.com/events.

Youth Mental Health First Aid Class Flyer FINAL_May 11

Maple Grove Hospital and North Memorial Health are partnering with
the Minnesota Department of Health to offer this Youth Mental Health
First Aid class in our community.

 

Please help promote Crisis Text Line!

MHU

DHS-7677LH_tcm1053-333832_page_001

As of April 1, Crisis Text Line is offering Text-based suicide prevention services across Minnesota. People who text MN to 741741 will be connected with a counselor who will help defuse the crisis and connect the texter to local resources. Crisis Text Line is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Now we need your help in getting the word out!

Resources to help children in the wake of a school shooting

Resources to help children in the wake of a school shooting

 

Father and son in skate park

 

By Jessica Dym Bartlett

As adults struggle with their own reactions to the school shooting in Parkland, Florida—the 29th mass shooting in the United States in the first two months of 2018 alone—young eyes and ears are watching and listening.

This is an important time to talk to children about what they are seeing and hearing, even when they did not directly witness the event. While it can be difficult to know what to say, evidence from research and clinical practice can help us with these difficult conversations. We begin with a few suggestions for adults who care for children indirectly affected by a school shooting:

Talking to children about school shootings

Honesty is important when speaking with children about school shootings, but that doesn’t mean they need to know the details. What children need to know, and how we talk with them about such tragedies, is best considered through a developmental lens. How we answer their questions, for example, should depend on what they can understand and process without heightening their distress.

For a child of any age, it is important to begin by finding out what they already know. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network recommends gently correcting inaccurate information, encouraging children to ask questions, and answering them directly. Adults can respond by acknowledging the child’s experience and feelings about the event, rather than focusing on the event itself. Parents can use a number of resources to find the right words to say, including apps such as Help Kids Cope. However, conversations should be tailored to the age of the child:

  • Infants and toddlers are comforted when caregivers are warm, sensitive to their needs (e.g., feeding, sleeping, comforting), and maintain predictable routines. Conversation about the event can be harmful to very young children, who are highly sensitive to adults’ emotions. Even if they can’t understand the content, they can sense that something is wrong and experience distress
  • Preschoolers do best when adults use a calm voice, simple language, and respond to their questions honestly but with limited detail. Death should not be a taboo subject with young children just because it is upsetting to adults. Most important, preschoolers need reassurance that they are safe. Safety can also be communicated nonverbally—for example, by participating in normal, everyday activities and receiving extra attention from adults. Early childhood programs and parents can jointly support children who experience a school shooting.
  • School-age children understand more than younger children and may want to talk about events at length with a trusted adult. Still, it is important not to offer disturbing details or to assume that children’s concerns are the same as those of adults. Like younger children, they need comfort and reassurance of their safety. They may want extra attention from adults and friends, and time to talk about subjects other than the school shooting. Schools can also serve as important sources of support by understanding and responding to a school shooting in trauma-informed ways.
  • Adolescents benefit when adults take time to listen, without judgment, to their thoughts and feelings about the school shooting. Teenagers can think abstractly and may struggle with larger issues, such as the meaning of life and death and social justice. They tend to value honesty and are quick to point out hypocrisy. However, it is important not to force adolescents to discuss the event until they are ready, as they are likely to resent when adults appear push their own agenda.

Other helpful hints

Talking to children and adolescents is not the only way to help them negotiate tragic events such as a school shooting. Here are a few additional tips:

  • Protect children from too much information. It is critical to carefully monitor adult conversations, limit media use in children’s presence, and seek support from other adults in private—exposure to disturbing images and conversations about the school shooting can stir up difficult feelings in children of all ages.
  • Keep children busy. Boredom can intensify negative thoughts and behaviors, but children are less likely to experience distress when they play and interact.
  • Ensure that adults receive the attention, support, and care they need. Parenting in the wake of a trauma can be difficult. Adults also need time and space to cope with their own reactions, as well as social support from family, friends, clergy, mental health professionals, and other adults.
  • Seek professional help. Seek professional help if a child’s difficulties do not improve. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) recommends seeking help if problems persist longer than six weeks.
  • Find age-appropriate ways for children to help. Even very young children benefit from being able to make a positive difference in others’ lives while learning important lessons about empathy, compassion, and gratitude.
  • Emphasize hope and positivity. Children need to feel safe, secure, and positive about their present and future. Seeing and hearing stories of people helping people in difficult times is both healing and reassuring.

Children with direct exposure to a school shooting

Children who directly experience school shootings are at the highest risk of developing posttraumatic stress and related symptoms (e.g., nightmares, trouble eating and sleeping, academic difficulties, excessive crying, clinginess, irritability, withdrawal, aggression, or avoiding the issue altogether). Moreover, upheaval among families, the school, and the community after a shooting can make it especially challenging for adults to maintain the predictable routines and calm demeanor that help children feel safe. In these instances, comprehensive approaches grounded in research on risk and resilience after trauma, such as Psychological First Aid, can be implemented. This may enhance both parents’ and children’s sense of safety, orient and soothe survivors, provide assistance to address a family’s immediate needs, and connect survivors with social support and services.

Additional resources

Helping Young Children Who Have Experienced Trauma: Policies and Strategies for Early Care and Education

Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Trauma

Child Trauma Toolkit for Educators

Talking to Children about the Shooting

2018 Military Mental Health Conference

You are formally invited to the 2018 Military Mental Health conference!

“Together – Serving Those Who Serve: Behind the Uniform”

Subject: 2018 Military Mental Health Conference

When: Thursday, April 26 – Friday, April 27, 2018

Where: Camp Ripley Training Center
15000 Highway 115
Little Falls, MN 56345

Even if you cannot personally attend, please forward this invitation along to anyone and everyone you think might be interested.

For more information and to register visit:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/military-mental-health-conference-2018-tickets-42004461475?aff=ehomesaved

Military Mental Health Conference 2018 Flyer.pdf

Troy A. Davidson
CPT, MNARNG
Program Manager
Resilience, Risk Reduction, & Suicide Prevention (R3SP)
651-268-8201

One number for mental health crisis services now being piloted in the Twin Cities

As we announced at the end of September, DHS has been testing a new phone number to connect people to crisis services. Testing of this number in the metro area has been completed, and the pilot of the new crisis number is now getting underway.

Starting Monday, January 8, individuals and service providers in the Twin Cities metro area, calling from a cell phone, can call one number — **CRISIS — and have their call seamlessly forwarded to their county crisis team.

At this time, **CRISIS is being piloted in the metro area only. The counties in the **CRISIS pilot are Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott and Washington. Eventually, **CRISIS will replace a list of 30 county crisis numbers across the state. As the system rolls out, a landline 800 number will be added for people without cell phones, especially in rural areas.

Note that during the pilot, in order not to miss any calls, if an individual outside of the metro area calls the number they will be routed to their local team as well. However, data collection will be focused on the metro area at this time. Also important is that the contractor was only able to set boundaries based on county lines not the reservations. Individuals will need to continue to dial the current number if they hope to reach a tribal team.

Statewide crisis provider meeting

During the February 13 statewide crisis provider meeting, we will discuss a plan to partner with crisis teams in the metro to promote the number within those communities.

Thank you again for your cooperation in partnering with the Department of Human Services to provide crisis services to Minnesotan’s.

Please contact Dominique.jones@state.mn.us with any questions.

 

For more information about mental health services in Minnesota, visit:

Children’s mental health / Adult mental health / Resources for partners and providers

Finding Steady

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Subject: The new Young Men’s Group is…
 

… called Finding Steady! And we are in great need of your help as we recruit participants for our February 6th start date! Attached is the flyer to pass along and/or hang wherever you think is helpful. The group is a 6-week, diagnosis-based endeavor and is open to all males in the high school age range. We’ll focus on building skills and finding ways to live calmed, contented, and connected lives.

Finding Steady Group Flyer.pdf

 

Free upcoming safeTALK training

Free training on suicide alertness skills. Please share with your mental health contacts. Here are the details and invitation and registration info attached. Please see the PDF below for more information.

WHAT: Free Suicide Alertness Training
WHEN: December 6, 2017
WHERE: 8180 Belden BLVD, Cottage Grove, MN 55016, 9:00am-1:00pm, free lunch included
Host: Wounded Warrior Project

Event is free but registration required at: https://safetalkwwp.eventbrite.com

safeTALK Flyer Dec 6.jpeg.PDF

Annette Brechon Kuyper
Director of Military Outreach
Minnesota Department of Military Affairs
20 West 12th Street
Saint Paul, MN 55155-2004
O: 651.282.4002
C: 651.955.3108

Supporting Students in Distress Workshop

Supporting Students in Distress Workshop

Many students who have experienced significant stress need adults to remain reflective and attend to what is underneath their challenging behavior. Geared toward helping professionals, teachers, caregivers and parents, this presentation will increase attendees’ ability to recognize how and where a child is struggling, name the experience, and use concise language to join the child in distress. The workshop will pay particular attention to the concept of joining, a state of mind caring adults possess when they are attending to the needs of children by talking and acting for the benefit of the child. This intentional relationship allows adults to join in the child’s perspective and make sense of his or her experiences. Using reflection and language as tools, workshop participants will learn how to create helpful spaces for problem solving rather than power struggles.

Lauren Nietz, LICSW, Consultant, Outpatient Therapist – Washburn Center for Children

 

Monday, November 13

9:00 am – 12:00 pm

St. Mary’s Greek Orthodox Church 

3450 Irving Avenue South

Maple Grove, MN 55408

 

3 CEHs | $89 but $75.65 if you register by October 13

NAMI MN Mental Health Training Opportunities

NAMI MN mental health training flyers

 

Question, Persuade, Refer 9.26.2017.pdf

Children’s Challenging Behaviors 10.14.2017.pdf

Special Education-Helping Students Succeed 10.24.2017.pdf

safeTALK 11.14.2017.pdf

sychosis (For Professionals) 11.15.2017.pdf

Mental Health Crisis Planning 12.05.2017.pdf

Transitions 2.6.2018.pdf

Understanding Early Episode Psychosis 3.13.2018.pdf

 

Thanking you, in advance.

Melodie

Melodie Hanson, Program Director
Robbinsdale Area Redesign
3730 Toledo Avenue N.
Robbinsdale, MN  55422
melodie_hanson@rdale.org
www.HelpingUsGrow.org
763-504-4981
763-504-4985 (Fax)
763-291-8413 (cell)

 

PLEASE NOTE OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATION (LISTED ABOVE) — EFFECTIVE 6/28/2017

The 5th Annual VA Mental Health Summit

The 5th Annual VA Mental Health Summit is quickly approaching!  Please join us on Friday, September 22 at the Bishop Henry Whipple Federal Building for this FREE conference, with a focus on mental health among the veteran and military populations, access to care, and excellent VA and community resources.

We have two keynote speakers, a panel discussion on veteran employment, and break-out sessions on related topics.  Please see the attached program with more detailed information and descriptions for each of our speakers.

Please register early, as space is limited!  You can register by opening the flyer, and clicking on the link at the very bottom to be directed to the Event Brite site, or use the link listed below, in this email.

Mental Health Summit program-2017.pdf

VA Mental Health Summit 2(002).pdf

Please let me know if you have any questions!

Thank you so much!

Amy

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/5th-annual-va-mental-health-summit-tickets-36275654459?aff=VAMentalHealthSummit


Amy Wood, MSW, LICSW
Local Recovery Coordinator
Peer Support Supervisor
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Minneapolis VA Health Care System (MVAHCS)
1 Veterans Dr (116A), Minneapolis, MN 55417 amy.wood1@va.gov<mailto:amy.wood1@va.gov>
Office:  612-629-7614
VA iPhone:  612-396-9223

To prevent youth suicide, we must address more than bullying

By Deborah Temkin


Last week, another story of a young person who died by suicide made headlines. As with the majority of articles covering youth suicides over the last decade, the story heavily focused on the role bullying may have played in precipitating the young girl’s death. While bullying could certainly have been a factor in this case (as an outside observer lacking all the facts, I can’t comment on this specific case), the same cannot be said about many incidents of youth suicide. Schools’ bullying prevention efforts are critically important. However, the continued narrative that youth suicide is caused by bullying may divert schools’ focus from solutions that would target more prevalent risk factors for suicide.

From 2007 to 2014, rates of deaths due to suicide among children ages 10 to 14 more than doubled, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This is consistent with a more recent study of children’s hospital admissions of children ages 5 to 17 from 2008 to 2015, which found a similar increase. However, over the same time period, rates of bullying for youth ages 12 to 18 significantly declined, from 32 percent in 2007 reporting having been bullied, to 21 percent in 2015. While comparing these two data trends cannot negate a connection between bullying and suicide-and indeed recent data show that youth who have been bullied report higher rates of suicidal ideation-it does suggest that many cases of youth suicide are not a result of bullying.

An analysis of data for youth ages 11 to 15 from the National Violent Death Reporting System, which collects information from 18 states about all reported suicides including precipitating circumstances, found that in 2003 through 2014, only around 9 percent of cases specifically indicated that bullying was a factor leading to the suicide. The same number of cases reported school disciplinary problems (e.g., being suspended from school). However, over half the cases (56 percent) listed relationship issues, primarily with family or intimate dating partners, as a precipitating factor, and a similar percentage (52 percent) of youth were reported to have had mental health problems. The majority of youth suicides (60 percent) involved multiple precipitating factors.

We cannot prevent all incidents of youth suicide by only focusing on bullying. Instead, we must target the many potential risk factors involved. For many schools, this might seem like a daunting task considering the variety of potential issues involved- from bullying to school discipline, to mental and physical health supports, to family engagement. These issues, however, are interconnected.

By approaching suicide prevention holistically-the whole child-instead of focusing solely on a single risk factor such as bullying, we may be better able to stem the tide of youth suicide. Schools can help promote positive relationships between and among students and teachers. They can recognize the contribution of physical wellness to mental wellness. And, they can actively engage families with the school community. In doing so, schools will target many suicide risk factors at once and, by extension, create healthy, safe, nurturing environments where youth suicides may be less likely.

This blog was developed with support from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (grant 74616). The views reflected in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

If you or someone you know is thinking of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Site at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Read this blog post at childtrends.org

Do you know a Champion for Change?

Do you know a Champion for Change?

Do you know a young person between the ages of 10 and 18 who’s been a champion for positive mental health in their school or community? We want to celebrate their awesome commitment to mental heath by inviting them to submit their story for our second annual Champion for Change Award.

To submit an entry they will need to record a video detailing how they have been a champion for those with mental health needs and submit it along with the online entry form.

Deadline: All entry materials (video, entry form, consent form) must be submitted by September 25, 2017 and winners will be notified by email no later than September 29, 2017.

Up to three videos will be selected and the award recipients will be celebrated and their videos shown at MACMH’s Silent Auction and Award Gala on Friday, November 10 at the Edinburgh Golf Course in Brooklyn Park.

 Contest Rules                Video Content Guide

Winners will receive a Commendation from Governor Mark Dayton and a $100 gift card!

Check out videos from last year’s award recipients!

Questions? Email or call us at 651-644-7333

Don’t forget to check out our Calendar of Events page.